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There’s now an easy way to download as many of the archived episodes as you like of this podcast. Just click here and download the mp3 files you’ll see listed there.

Enjoy!

Where’s the audio?

From this date (15 Oct.) forward, if you want to download episodes of the Missing Link, please e-mail me, and I will be happy to send them to you. I am no longer maintaining the account where the audio files were housed.

Wondering where episode 15 (for September 2008) is? If you haven’t heard the last few minutes of episode 14, then you missed my explaining that I need to put this podcast on indefinite hiatus.

I have enjoyed producing this podcast immensely, and I’m sorry to let it go, even if this does end up being a temporary separation.

I had hoped that the 40-60 hours that I spent producing each episode would dwindle as I became more adept with the audio technology. However, I found that even with some experience, the audio took considerable time, as did the research for each episode. I’m finding I cannot sustain that chunk of time each month, what with my other personal and professional commitments. And I’m not willing to sacrifice quality just to keep things going in skeletal form.

As I said at the end of episode 14, I hope that you will continue to enjoy the existing episodes, which are still available here and on iTunes. If you’re looking for related programming, you can find some of my favorite podcasts linked in the sidebar at right.

Perhaps one of you will even pick up the torch and begin a podcast of your own on the history of science. Please feel free to get in touch if you do. I’ll be happy to talk over your plans with you.

Best wishes,

Elizabeth

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This month, guest Daniel Goldberg gives a provocative look into the world of pain without lesion. How do – and should – doctors handle patients’ pain when there’s no visible cause?

Guest essay – Daniel S. Goldberg, “Where Does It Hurt?”

for further reading:

Daniel S. Goldberg received his B.A. with honors in philosophy from Wesleyan University, his J.D. magna cum laude from the University of Houston Law Center, and is currently a Ph.D student in the medical humanities at University of Texas Medical Branch. He is also a health policy fellow at Baylor College of Medicine’s Chronic Disease Prevention & Control Research Center, and a Research Professor at Baylor College of Medicine’s Initiative on Law, Brains, and Behavior. His work focuses on a variety of issues, including conflicts of interest, neuroethics, disabilities, and the social determinants of health. His forthcoming dissertation will use the lenses of the medical humanities to address the root causes of the widespread under-treatment of pain in the U.S. He is also interested in assessing the role of the medical humanities for health policy.

On the Shelf:

Audio credits:

All music on this program courtesy of the Podsafe Music Network, except where noted.

Dartmouth today

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Today we alight in Devonshire, England. The beaches in this gorgeous, southwestern coastal county have long been a major summer tourist destination. In this episode, we’ll learn about how Devon’s seaside resorts transformed from health spas into centers of epidemic disease. We’ll also discover just what kinds of behaviors could land you in the insane asylums of Victorian Devonshire.

This episode is the second in our periodic “On Location” series. (Click here for the first episode in this series, on Berlin.)

For further reading:

On the shelf:

Other links:

  • I can recommend very highly the B&B where we stayed in Devon: The Old Rectory in Diptford. Gorgeous. Delicious. Friendly. Give their dog, Danny, a pat from me.
No Text

Philip Gosse's aquarium

Audio credits:

All music on this program courtesy of the Podsafe Music Network, except where noted.

Listen to this episode.

Warning: This episode contains frank discussions of human anatomy and some violence.

Ever wondered why wonder is so important in science? We’re taught from an early edge that science is a world of wonder, and encouraged to indulge our natural curiosity as a first step to achieving scientific rationality. Today, we’ll investigate the fascinating history of wonder, including times when wonder was not in fashion and times when it led grown men to kick old women in the stomach. (Yes, you will need to listen to find what that refers to.)

Guest voice: Many thanks to Tim Ralphs of the Room Behind the Bookcase podcast for playing Ambroise Paré.

For further reading:

On the shelf:

Other links:

Audio credits:

All music on this program courtesy of the Podsafe Music Network, except where noted.

Listen to this episode.

Most of us encounter science through the the world of popular science: the books, TV shows, museum exhibits, kits, and toys that are packaged for general consumption. Today, we explore the early days of mass-produced popular science, particularly the books written for women and children.

Guest essay – Michal Meyer, “No Place for a Lady”

  • Michal Meyer is a graduate student in the history of science at the University of Florida. She is writing her dissertation on Mary Somerville, focusing on the influences of empire and Romanticism on Somerville’s books aimed at a general audience. In a previous life she worked as a journalist in Israel and a meteorologist in New Zealand. You can contact her at michal AT hssonline DOT org.

Host essay – “Fun for the Whole Family”

For further reading:

On the shelf:

Audio credits:

All music on this program courtesy of the Podsafe Music Network, except where noted.

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